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Tiroler Festspiele Erl - Camerata Salzburg & Paul Lewis

BEETHOVEN'S PIANO CONCERTOS AS PENTAGON
The five piano concertos by Ludwig van Beethoven were written over a period of 22 years between 1787 and 1809, and in keeping with the type of composing instrumental virtuoso that was popular with audiences of the time, Beethoven wrote concertos primarily for his own performance. Since he was then no longer able to perform as a piano soloist due to his hearing impairment, there was no longer any practical reason to compose further piano concertos. But the five concerts also form an impressive cycle, comparable to Beethoven's symphonies, piano sonatas and string quartets. His path from the classical concert type of Mozart to the great symphonic concert of the 19th century becomes impressively apparent. The five concerts combine to form a musical-historical pentagon when, as now in Erl, they are all performed by Paul Lewis as soloist and the Camerata Salzburg under the direction of Andrew Manze. Like Beethoven's symphonies and piano sonatas, some of which have been given formative epithets, the piano concertos carry the themes of Beethoven's life - the struggle for destiny, the struggle for freedom, humanism, brotherhood, loneliness - within themselves. Thus, from the basic key of C minor and the path from darkness to light, lines of relationship stretch from the Third Piano Concerto to the Fifth Symphony, the "Fate Symphony", and the Piano Sonata op. 13, the "Pathétique". The heroic, in turn, is not only a basic characteristic of the Third Symphony, the "Eroica", but also of two piano concertos, the first and the fifth, which in English even received the name "Emperor Concerto". "Conquered" become humane values. "Pastoral" music exists not only among the piano sonatas (op. 28) and the symphonies (no. 6), but also - although not so named - among the piano concertos: the second op. 19 and the fourth op. 58, in which man, the soloist individual, finds harmony with nature's multi-coloured orchestra.

SCHUBERT AND THE CAMERATA
The Camerata Salzburg is most intimately associated with Schubert's music, alongside that of Mozart. Since the days of the artistic director Sándor Végh, whose Schubert cycle with the Camerata has become a legend, orchestral and chamber music works by Schubert have been at the heart of the Camerata repertoire. For seven years now, the world-famous Salzburg Chamber Orchestra has also had its own festival "Schubert in Gastein". The Camerata is even "related" to Schubert. One of Schubert's greatest patrons, the Steyr patron of the arts Sylvester Paumgartner, who commissioned the "Trout Quintet", was the great-great-great-uncle of Bernhard Paumgartner, the conductor and co-founder of the Salzburg Festival, who founded the Camerata in 1952 and directed it until his death in 1971. Her "Schubert gene" will bring the Camerata to life in Erl 2020 with the Symphonies No. 3 and No. 7 and the "Italian Overture" in C major, conducted by the Englishman Andrew Manze, whose meteoric conducting career followed a worldwide successful career as an original violinist. His recordings of the Schubert violin sonatas are considered exemplary today. The symphonic composer Schubert was not discovered until several decades after the song composer Schubert. But while the "Unfinished" then became one of the most popular pieces of classical music, earlier symphonies are still not as well known. Yet they too appear to be a wonder of the world. How could a youth in Vienna seamlessly follow on from the symphonies of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven? And at the same time set new impulses that shone out over the entire romantic century?

Camerata Salzburg
Conductor Andrew Manze
Piano Paul Lewis

SA 25 JULY
FRANZ SCHUBERT
Overture in Italian style C major op. 170 D. 591

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN
Concerto for piano and orchestra no. 2 B flat major op. 19
Concerto for piano and orchestra no. 4 G major op. 58

DI 28 JULY
FRANZ SCHUBERT
Symphony No. 3 D Major D. 200

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN
Concerto for piano and orchestra no. 1 C major op. 15
Concerto for piano and orchestra no. 3 in C minor op. 3

MI 29 JULY
FRANZ SCHUBERT
Symphony No. 7 in B minor D. 759 "Unfinished"

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN
Concerto for piano and orchestra in E flat major op. 73 "Emperor Concerto


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Tiroler Festspiele Erl - Camerata Salzburg & Paul Lewis - Erl

BEETHOVEN'S PIANO CONCERTOS AS PENTAGON
The five piano concertos by Ludwig van Beethoven were written over a period of 22 years between 1787 and 1809, and in keeping with the type of composing instrumental virtuoso that was popular with audiences of the time, Beethoven wrote concertos primarily for his own performance. Since he was then no longer able to perform as a piano soloist due to his hearing impairment, there was no longer any practical reason to compose further piano concertos. But the five concerts also form an impressive cycle, comparable to Beethoven's symphonies, piano sonatas and string quartets. His path from the classical concert type of Mozart to the great symphonic concert of the 19th century becomes impressively apparent. The five concerts combine to form a musical-historical pentagon when, as now in Erl, they are all performed by Paul Lewis as soloist and the Camerata Salzburg under the direction of Andrew Manze. Like Beethoven's symphonies and piano sonatas, some of which have been given formative epithets, the piano concertos carry the themes of Beethoven's life - the struggle for destiny, the struggle for freedom, humanism, brotherhood, loneliness - within themselves. Thus, from the basic key of C minor and the path from darkness to light, lines of relationship stretch from the Third Piano Concerto to the Fifth Symphony, the "Fate Symphony", and the Piano Sonata op. 13, the "Pathétique". The heroic, in turn, is not only a basic characteristic of the Third Symphony, the "Eroica", but also of two piano concertos, the first and the fifth, which in English even received the name "Emperor Concerto". "Conquered" become humane values. "Pastoral" music exists not only among the piano sonatas (op. 28) and the symphonies (no. 6), but also - although not so named - among the piano concertos: the second op. 19 and the fourth op. 58, in which man, the soloist individual, finds harmony with nature's multi-coloured orchestra.

SCHUBERT AND THE CAMERATA
The Camerata Salzburg is most intimately associated with Schubert's music, alongside that of Mozart. Since the days of the artistic director Sándor Végh, whose Schubert cycle with the Camerata has become a legend, orchestral and chamber music works by Schubert have been at the heart of the Camerata repertoire. For seven years now, the world-famous Salzburg Chamber Orchestra has also had its own festival "Schubert in Gastein". The Camerata is even "related" to Schubert. One of Schubert's greatest patrons, the Steyr patron of the arts Sylvester Paumgartner, who commissioned the "Trout Quintet", was the great-great-great-uncle of Bernhard Paumgartner, the conductor and co-founder of the Salzburg Festival, who founded the Camerata in 1952 and directed it until his death in 1971. Her "Schubert gene" will bring the Camerata to life in Erl 2020 with the Symphonies No. 3 and No. 7 and the "Italian Overture" in C major, conducted by the Englishman Andrew Manze, whose meteoric conducting career followed a worldwide successful career as an original violinist. His recordings of the Schubert violin sonatas are considered exemplary today. The symphonic composer Schubert was not discovered until several decades after the song composer Schubert. But while the "Unfinished" then became one of the most popular pieces of classical music, earlier symphonies are still not as well known. Yet they too appear to be a wonder of the world. How could a youth in Vienna seamlessly follow on from the symphonies of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven? And at the same time set new impulses that shone out over the entire romantic century?

Camerata Salzburg
Conductor Andrew Manze
Piano Paul Lewis

SA 25 JULY
FRANZ SCHUBERT
Overture in Italian style C major op. 170 D. 591

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN
Concerto for piano and orchestra no. 2 B flat major op. 19
Concerto for piano and orchestra no. 4 G major op. 58

DI 28 JULY
FRANZ SCHUBERT
Symphony No. 3 D Major D. 200

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN
Concerto for piano and orchestra no. 1 C major op. 15
Concerto for piano and orchestra no. 3 in C minor op. 3

MI 29 JULY
FRANZ SCHUBERT
Symphony No. 7 in B minor D. 759 "Unfinished"

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN
Concerto for piano and orchestra in E flat major op. 73 "Emperor Concerto


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