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Berthold Seliger 'From the Empire Business' - READING

In his new book Berthold Seliger deals with the background of the concert business of our days. In detailed analyses and background reports he takes the current developments in the concentration processes in the German and international concert industry as well as the dubious latest tricks in ticketing as an opportunity for concrete proposals on how to curb the machinations of corporations that endanger the cultural diversity of society with consistent legislation. Seliger researched the ownership structure of the large and medium-sized concert companies and the leading European festivals and tracked down private equity and international fund companies that actually dominate the concert industry. The outside world is dominated by a neo-liberal "jargon of actuality", it's about cool events, fun and self-realization, but if you look behind the scenes, you'll see that live companies only need music and artists* for brands and marketing. Today the big money is earned with sponsoring, ticketing and big data, and the big companies of the concert industry are hardly interested in music and culture anymore, but only in the biggest possible profit. In another major chapter, Seliger writes a history of festivals from Monterey and Woodstock to Coachella and Burning Man, points out undesirable developments in the festival business and explains the surprising influence of Silicon Valley on today's festival landscape. And he takes a close look at the Essen Song Days of 1968 and describes their history as well as current developments on the German and European festival market. Seliger counters the empire business of the music industry with the concept of independent music clubs, socio-cultural centres and artistic festivals. He is concerned with the development of spaces of possibility and utopian places in which a culture beyond corporations can once again take place. Here Seliger also brings together discussions that dominate society and are usually conducted in isolation from one another: What do Smart Cities, which are built by one of the world's largest music companies in big cities, have to do with the rents for the population and the death of clubs? Why are cheap rents an important promotion of music? How can it be possible to regain public space for the people who live in the cities? Seliger is developing a theory of protecting cultural sites that is directly related to the social situation of musicians* and cultural workers*. The basic idea behind Seliger's reflections is always the interests of the musicians* and the concert visitors*. Only if they defend themselves at all levels against the empire business of the culture industry will cultural diversity in our society be preserved. Seliger, "Germany's most eloquent concert agent" (Berliner Zeitung), knows the numbers and names them. In some cases, "Vom Imperiengeschäft" reads like a whodunit. "Seliger speaks plainly, his profound knowledge of the music business comes first-hand..." (Der Standard)
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Berthold Seliger 'From the Empire Business' - READING - Kufstein

In his new book Berthold Seliger deals with the background of the concert business of our days. In detailed analyses and background reports he takes the current developments in the concentration processes in the German and international concert industry as well as the dubious latest tricks in ticketing as an opportunity for concrete proposals on how to curb the machinations of corporations that endanger the cultural diversity of society with consistent legislation. Seliger researched the ownership structure of the large and medium-sized concert companies and the leading European festivals and tracked down private equity and international fund companies that actually dominate the concert industry. The outside world is dominated by a neo-liberal "jargon of actuality", it's about cool events, fun and self-realization, but if you look behind the scenes, you'll see that live companies only need music and artists* for brands and marketing. Today the big money is earned with sponsoring, ticketing and big data, and the big companies of the concert industry are hardly interested in music and culture anymore, but only in the biggest possible profit. In another major chapter, Seliger writes a history of festivals from Monterey and Woodstock to Coachella and Burning Man, points out undesirable developments in the festival business and explains the surprising influence of Silicon Valley on today's festival landscape. And he takes a close look at the Essen Song Days of 1968 and describes their history as well as current developments on the German and European festival market. Seliger counters the empire business of the music industry with the concept of independent music clubs, socio-cultural centres and artistic festivals. He is concerned with the development of spaces of possibility and utopian places in which a culture beyond corporations can once again take place. Here Seliger also brings together discussions that dominate society and are usually conducted in isolation from one another: What do Smart Cities, which are built by one of the world's largest music companies in big cities, have to do with the rents for the population and the death of clubs? Why are cheap rents an important promotion of music? How can it be possible to regain public space for the people who live in the cities? Seliger is developing a theory of protecting cultural sites that is directly related to the social situation of musicians* and cultural workers*. The basic idea behind Seliger's reflections is always the interests of the musicians* and the concert visitors*. Only if they defend themselves at all levels against the empire business of the culture industry will cultural diversity in our society be preserved. Seliger, "Germany's most eloquent concert agent" (Berliner Zeitung), knows the numbers and names them. In some cases, "Vom Imperiengeschäft" reads like a whodunit. "Seliger speaks plainly, his profound knowledge of the music business comes first-hand..." (Der Standard)

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