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Tiroler Festspiele Erl - Final concert

"The Scottish Highlands and the sea brew nothing but whisky, fog and bad weather together," was the verdict of the then 20-year-old Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, who travelled through England and Scotland with a friend in 1829. And yet he was deeply impressed by the Hebrides, that legendary group of islands in the middle of the raging sea, which inspired him to write the composition that Mendelssohn later published under the title "Hebriden-Ouvertüre". One believes one hears the cries of the seagulls and the force of the spray, but also the loneliness of a person surrounded by the boundless expanse of the sea. But the actual destination of Mendelssohn's journey was not Scotland, but London. Besides the performances of his concerts, he found time to visit the British Museum. Here he discovered George Frideric Handel's oratorio "Israel in Egypt". Ten years later Mendelssohn - inspired by Handel - composed his Psalm 114 "As Israel came out of Egypt". From England, the journey continues on to China, as Gustav Mahler and Hans Bethge dreamed. Bethge's collection "The Chinese Flute" contains free re-enactments of poetry from the Tang dynasty; Mahler used them to create music about earthly finiteness. His "Song of the Earth" is actually a symphony in the form of six orchestral songs. In them he sets to music the cycle of life - from youth to farewell - and later writes about them: "I believe that it is probably the most personal thing I have done so far".

FELIX MENDELSSOHN BARTHOLDY
"The Hebrides"
Overture op. 26 MWV P 7
Psalm 114 op. 51

GUSTAV MAHLER
"Song of the Earth"

Orchestra and Choir of the Tyrolean Festival Erl
Conductor Antonello Manacorda
Mezzo-soprano Paula Murrihy
Tenor AJ Glueckert

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Tiroler Festspiele Erl - Final concert - Erl

"The Scottish Highlands and the sea brew nothing but whisky, fog and bad weather together," was the verdict of the then 20-year-old Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, who travelled through England and Scotland with a friend in 1829. And yet he was deeply impressed by the Hebrides, that legendary group of islands in the middle of the raging sea, which inspired him to write the composition that Mendelssohn later published under the title "Hebriden-Ouvertüre". One believes one hears the cries of the seagulls and the force of the spray, but also the loneliness of a person surrounded by the boundless expanse of the sea. But the actual destination of Mendelssohn's journey was not Scotland, but London. Besides the performances of his concerts, he found time to visit the British Museum. Here he discovered George Frideric Handel's oratorio "Israel in Egypt". Ten years later Mendelssohn - inspired by Handel - composed his Psalm 114 "As Israel came out of Egypt". From England, the journey continues on to China, as Gustav Mahler and Hans Bethge dreamed. Bethge's collection "The Chinese Flute" contains free re-enactments of poetry from the Tang dynasty; Mahler used them to create music about earthly finiteness. His "Song of the Earth" is actually a symphony in the form of six orchestral songs. In them he sets to music the cycle of life - from youth to farewell - and later writes about them: "I believe that it is probably the most personal thing I have done so far".

FELIX MENDELSSOHN BARTHOLDY
"The Hebrides"
Overture op. 26 MWV P 7
Psalm 114 op. 51

GUSTAV MAHLER
"Song of the Earth"

Orchestra and Choir of the Tyrolean Festival Erl
Conductor Antonello Manacorda
Mezzo-soprano Paula Murrihy
Tenor AJ Glueckert

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